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Boris Johnson Controversy- High-Stakes Parliamentary Deliberations Today as Top Ministers Resign!

boris johnson controversy

Since 2019, Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson, a British politician born on June 19, 1964, has held the positions of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and Leader of the Conservative Party. From 2016 to 2018, he served as the secretary of state for foreign and Commonwealth affairs.

From 2008 to 2016, he served as the mayor of London. Johnson served as the Member of Parliament (MP) for Henley from 2001 to 2008 until becoming the MP for Uxbridge and South Ruislip in 2015.

Johnson studied Classics at Oxford’s Balliol College while attending Eton College. In 1986, he was chosen to lead the Oxford Union. He started working for The Daily Telegraph as a political columnist and Brussels reporter in 1989.

From 1999 to 2005, he served as editor of The Spectator magazine. Johnson served as a shadow minister for Conservative leaders Michael Howard and David Cameron after being elected to the legislature in 2001. He left the House of Commons after being elected mayor of London in 2008; he was re-elected in 2012. Johnson won the seat of MP for Uxbridge and South Ruislip in the 2015 election.

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The next year, he decided not to run for mayor again. In the successful Vote Leave campaign for Brexit during the 2016 EU membership referendum, he rose to prominence. After the referendum, Theresa May named him foreign secretary; he left the post two years later in opposition to May’s Chequers Agreement.

High-Stakes Parliamentary Deliberations Today as Top Ministers Resign

Following the shocking resignations of two top ministers, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson will participate in two crucial parliamentary debates on Wednesday.

On Tuesday evening, Sajid Javid resigned as health secretary and Rishi Sunak resigned as finance minister. Both people declared that they could no longer put up with the scandalous culture that has followed Johnson for months.

At the weekly Prime Minister’s Questions session, which will take place in the House of Commons at 1100 GMT and is expected to be much more explosive than usual, they will now sit on the Conservative back benches.

The chairs of the Commons’ most influential committees, who include some of Johnson’s vehement detractors from the ranks of the Tories, will then quiz Johnson for hours.

Minutes after the prime minister expressed regret for hiring a top Conservative who resigned last week after being accused of drunkenly touching two men, Mr Sunak and Mr Javid’s resignations were announced.

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Following Chris Pincher’s departure as deputy chief whip, several excuses had been offered for days. When Johnson appointed Pincher in February, Downing Street initially denied Johnson was aware of any earlier accusations made against Pincher.

However, by Tuesday, that defence had been exposed after a former senior official said Johnson, then serving as foreign minister, had been informed in 2019 about a different incident involving an ally.

For Sunak and Javid, the Pincher scandal was the “icing on the cake,” according to Tory MP Andrew Bridgen, a Johnson detractor, who spoke to Sky News.

“Boris needs to leave now. He has the option of delaying this for a few more hours. But I and a large portion of the party are now adamant that he will go by the summer break, which begins on July 22, the earlier the better.

The resignations dominated the front pages of British newspapers. The Times reported that the “seemingly concerted” action “dealt a possibly fatal blow to the prime minister” with the headline “Johnson on the edge.”

The prime minister’s former employers at The Daily Telegraph described Johnson as being “hanging by a thread as Sunak and Javid walk away.” The conservative Daily Mail tabloid was more colourful: “Can even Boris the Greased Piglet squirm out of this?” The Guardian and Financial Times both stated that the PM was “on the brink” of collapse.

The resignations followed Johnson’s narrow escape from a no-confidence vote among Conservative MPs a month earlier.

According to insiders, Johnson continues to have support from other cabinet members, notably Foreign Secretary Liz Truss and Defence Secretary Ben Wallace, two likely candidates for the presidency.

Humility?

A steadfastly devoted cabinet colleague named Jacob Rees-Mogg dismissed the resignations as “small local concerns.” He claimed on Sky News that “losing chancellors is something that occurs,” citing previous Tory leaders, albeit Margaret Thatcher was ultimately overthrown by a cabinet mutiny by key allies.

Johnson is disappointed by Sunak’s resignation in particular, which comes amid policy disagreements over a cost-of-living crisis engulfing Britain.

The public “rightly expects the government to be done professionally, competently, and seriously,” according to the chancellor of the exchequer.

Sunak wrote to Johnson, “I feel these values are worth fighting for and that is why I am retiring.” Sunak’s predecessor, Javid, left the Treasury after an altercation with Johnson. He claimed that the prime minister’s victory in the no-confidence vote last month provided him with the chance to demonstrate “humility, grip, and new direction.”

However, I must state that it is obvious to me that this scenario will not change under your leadership, and as a result, you have also lost my trust.

Collapsing

Johnson has been involved in a number of scandals, but perhaps none more so than the infamous “Partygate” incident, in which he was fined by the police for violating his own coronavirus lockdown rules in Downing Street.

A parliamentary investigation into whether the 58-year-old prime minister lied to MPs on the lockdown-violating parties in Downing Street is still ongoing. Pincher’s resignation from the whips’ post, which is responsible for upholding party rules and discipline, was the result of yet another sexual misconduct claim made against the Tories in recent months.

After being seen using his mobile device to view pornography in the House of Commons, Conservative MP Neil Parish announced his resignation in April. Due to the opposition Liberal Democrats’ historic triumph, a by-election was called in his hitherto secure seat as a result.

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Due to the conviction of its Tory MP for sexual assault, Labour, the main opposition party, beat the Conservatives in another by-election in northern England on the same day. The debates have occurred as Britain struggles with an aggravating cost-of-living problem and a summer of union strikes over pay and working conditions.

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