Lizzo Grrrls Controversy- Due to An Ableist Slur Issue, Pop Diva Lizzo Has Changed Her Lyrics to Grrrls!

lizzo grrrls controversy

Melissa Viviane Jefferson (born April 27, 1988) is an American singer, rapper, and songwriter who goes by the stage name Lizzo. She was born in Detroit, Michigan, then moved to Houston, Texas, where she began performing before relocating to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where she began her hip hop music recording career. Lizzo released two studio albums before signing with Nice Life and Atlantic Records: Lizzobangers (2013) and Big Grrrl Small World (2015). (2015). Coconut Oil, Lizzo’s debut major-label EP, was released in 2016.

Lizzo achieved mainstream popularity with the release of her third studio album, Cuz I Love You (2019), which charted in the top five on the Billboard 200 in the United States. The singles “Juice” and “Tempo” were released from the album. The album’s deluxe edition contained Lizzo’s 2017 single “Truth Hurts,” which became a viral sleeper hit, topping the US Billboard Hot 100 two years after its initial release and setting a new record for the longest-running solo song by a female rapper.

Her 2016 single “Good as Hell” entered the charts at the same time, hitting the top three on the Hot 100 and the top ten on the UK Singles Chart. Lizzo garnered the most Grammy nominations of any artist that year, with eight, including Album of the Year for the deluxe version of Cuz I Love You, Song of the Year and Record of the Year for “Truth Hurts,” and Best New Artist. She went on to win Best Urban Contemporary Album, Best Pop Solo Performance for “Truth Hurts,” and Best Traditional R&B Performance for “Jerome.”

Due to An Ableist Slur Issue, Pop Diva Lizzo Has Changed Her Lyrics to Grrrls

Following an outcry from the disabled community, pop diva Lizzo has confirmed that the words of her new song “Grrrls” will be changed. The pop diva has been chastised by the community for employing a “ableist slur” in her new song. On Friday, the song “Grrrls” was released. It’s a track from Lizzo’s upcoming album “Special,” which will be released later this year.

lizzo grrrls controversy

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The word in question is “spaz,” which is occasionally used as a derogatory term for people with disabilities. Many of Lizzo’s followers chastised her for using such nasty songs, which sparked the controversy.

Lizzo, on the other hand, stated on Monday that she did not want to “promote negative language,” and that she would release a new version of the song with new lyrics. She also said she was “proud” of changing the words of the song “Grrrls.”

Lizzo claimed that she could understand how nasty words may badly affect a person while announcing the release of the new version of the song, as she had also suffered such challenges as a fat black woman in the United States. She went on to say that she was gladly revising the problematic lyrics.

Fans Ask Lizzo to Remove New Song Due to Lyric in ‘Ableist’

Lizzo has responded to backlash over her usage of the term “spaz” in her new single “Grrrls,” informing fans that any offense was inadvertent and that the lyric will be changed. Fans and critics slammed the phrase as an ableist slur directed towards those with disabilities such as cerebral palsy.

“Let me be clear: I never wish to promote derogatory language,” Lizzo started on Monday, June 13th, in a note uploaded on social media. “As a large black woman in America, I’ve had many nasty things directed at me, so I’m aware of the power that words can have (whether intentionally or unwittingly in my situation).”

She then revealed that a new version of “Grrrls” had been released as a result of her “hearing and acting.” Lizzo’s entire note is below:

“Grrrls,” Lizzo’s latest single, is getting a lot of attention for all the wrong reasons. The new single, which was released on June 10th to promote the singer’s impending sophomore album, has been criticized for its opening lines, which contain a bad choice of words.

“Hold my bag bitch / Hold my bag / Do you see this sht / I’m a sp*z,” Lizzo sings in the first line. The final word drew the ire of disability campaigners, who claim the term is an ableist slur mocking persons with disabilities such as cerebral palsy.

“I’m unhappy in @lizzo for using the “sp@z” in her new song “Grrrls,” one Twitter user commented. In the year 2022, there’s no excuse for employing an ableist insult in a song. Lizzo preaches inclusivity and could do better as someone who advocates women, plus-size persons, and others who society treats unfairly.” “Hey @lizzo,” someone else tweeted.

My Cerebral Palsy is officially classed as Spastic Diplegia (in which spasticity refers to the unending excruciating stiffness in my legs), and your new song makes me angry and sad. ‘Spaz’ does not signify ‘crazy’ or ‘freaked out.’ It’s a pejorative used by ableists. The year is 2022. “Be a better person.”

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lizzo grrrls controversy

While some fans have been critical of the controversy, others believe it may be used as a teaching tool. “I’ve seen a few comments on the internet talking about ‘canceling Lizzo,’ and that’s not what we want,” another Twitter user commented. “We want to educate her and change the phrase.” “To begin with, just to be clear?” wrote another supporter on Twitter. I don’t agree with the word’s use. I also believe there should be a means to communicate with her in order to educate her and wait for a response before we consider nailing her to the cross.”

More fans are asking the singer to address their concerns as the discourse surrounding “Grrrls” continues to expand. Lizzo has yet to comment on the topic or announce whether she would change the lyrics.

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Mary

I'm a researcher and behavioural therapist with a PhD in Social Media. I also love to travel and drink coffee. Follow my adventures around the world, or just know that I really need to be back at the library.