Nickelback Controversy- Exactly How Nickelback Became the World’s Most Controversial Band!

nickelback controversy

Founded in 1995, Hanna, Alberta-based rock band Nickelback has sold over 30 million albums worldwide. The band consists of Chad Kroeger on guitar and vocals, Ryan Peake on guitar and keyboards and backing vocals, Mike Kroeger on bass, and Daniel Adair on drums. Between 1995 and 2005, the band went through several drummer changes before settling on Adair to replace Ryan Vikedal in the lineup.

Nickelback has sold more than 50 million albums worldwide, making them one of the most successful Canadian rock bands.

“How You Remind Me” was Billboard’s best-selling rock song of the decade, as well as the fourth-best overall. Four of the band’s albums made Billboard’s top ten albums of the decade list, placing them at No. 7 overall.

What Made This Group the Most Hated Band in The World?

It’s only natural that Nickelback got their start as a cover band in Alberta in the mid-’90s. Curb, their debut album of original material, was released in 1996. Chad Kroeger and his brothers Mike (bass) and Brandon (drums), along with Ryan Peake (guitar) were the original members of Curb.

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Curb had a dreadful record on all counts. It was a shambles, a disarray, a shambles. Even so, it had the kind of vigour and drive that would entice a few A&Rs to sign the band.

nickelback controversy

A new drummer replaced Brandon Kroeger, and the band released The State on its own label in 1998. The post-grunge era came to an end with this album. It was rough and unpolished, frantic and paranoid all at once. Despite its flaws, you couldn’t deny that it was an enjoyable listening experience. At the very least, it helped Nickelback secure a major-label contract with Roadrunner Records.

No new ground was broken with the album’s songs, which dealt with themes of disillusionment and the inability to find one’s footing. It was reminiscent of the angst of the late 1990s in terms of its sound. Here, it’s a Bush ripoff; over there, it’s a Foo Fighters tribute.

It’s only natural that Nickelback got their start as a cover band in Alberta in the mid-’90s. Curb, their debut album of original material, was released in 1996. The original line-up of Curb included Chad Kroeger, his brothers Mike and Brandon, and Ryan Peake, who played guitar.

Curb had a dreadful record on all counts. It was a shambles, a disarray, a shambles. Even so, it had the kind of vigour and drive that would entice a few A&Rs to sign the band.

A new drummer replaced Brandon Kroeger, and the band released The State on its own label in 1998. The post-grunge era came to an end with this album. It was shaky and jittery, loud and a little paranoid at times. A great album? Not likely, but it was at least interesting and worth listening to. That Nickelback signed a major label deal with Roadrunner Records is interesting enough.

Rather than reinventing the post-grunge wheel, the songs on this album focused on themes of distrust and drama as well as a lack of stability. That late 90s sound could be heard in its music. A Bush-like figure is mirrored in this instance, while a Foo Fighters-like figure is imitated elsewhere.

The Beginning of Nickelback

It was frontman Chad Kroeger and drummer Ryan Peake who formed Nickelback in the early ’90s as a Canadian cover band. Curb, their first full-length album, was released in 1996 and was enough to get them signed to their first record label.

The State, their first album with their new label, debuted at No. 1 and went on to sell millions of copies. The song “How You Remind Me” became a hit for the band after it was released on the band’s second album.

What Happened to Nickelback? “How You Remind Me” and “rockstar” Were the Beginning of The End

All of the radio stations played the hit song “How You Remind Me” over and over and over again. What a hit song should have, and why it performed so well, was all there was to it.

The song peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and remained in the top ten for 20 weeks.

One of their most popular songs is also the one that has been played over and over again on the radio, much to the annoyance of those who once found it irresistible. Every other rock band at the time was doing similar songs in similar ways, and they were eventually exposed for their lack of originality and creativity by fans and critics alike.

“Rockstar” was another song that soared to worldwide fame after its release in 2006, selling millions of copies. This song was fine until it was allowed to be played in an advertisement for the sofa brand DFS. As a result of the band’s decision to allow the song to be used in the terrible commercial, memes began to circulate.

Where Are They Now?

They’ve gone from their rock roots to producing generic pop songs—following the same formula they used with their previous albums, creating songs that follow in the footsteps of other famous pop songs, but bring nothing new to the table.

Currently, the Nickelback memes are more popular than the band itself, and many of the band’s most recent public performances, such as the 2011 Thanksgiving halftime game, have sparked petitions calling for their removal.

nickelback controversy

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President Trump tweeted an edited video of Joe Biden to Nickelback’s song “Photograph,” captioning the tweet “LOOK AT THIS PHOTOGRAPH.” Unfortunately, the tweet has been taken down, but Nickelback saw a surge in digital downloads of almost 500 percent. As a result, it appears that their status as a meme is paying off for the time being.

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Mary

I'm a researcher and behavioural therapist with a PhD in Social Media. I also love to travel and drink coffee. Follow my adventures around the world, or just know that I really need to be back at the library.